Discussion:
manually configure network
(too old to reply)
mick howe via arch-general
2017-07-12 23:09:22 UTC
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I've just changed ISP and I can't get the changed configuration to stick.

I'm using 'static IP address - manual assignment' from Network
configuration wiki page.

I need to change my address from 192.168.1.0/24 to 192.168.20.1/24.

using iproute2 tools as per wiki I can get everything working UNTIL I
reboot, at which time some of the settings show the old values and others
the new.

I've been manually configuring these settings without problems since I
started using linux in 1994.
Mrrob
2017-07-13 01:17:56 UTC
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Post by mick howe via arch-general
I've just changed ISP and I can't get the changed configuration to stick.
I'm using 'static IP address - manual assignment' from Network
configuration wiki page.
I need to change my address from 192.168.1.0/24 to 192.168.20.1/24.
using iproute2 tools as per wiki I can get everything working UNTIL I
reboot, at which time some of the settings show the old values and others
the new.
I've been manually configuring these settings without problems since I
started using linux in 1994.
I assume that (as well as changing ISPs) you have changed your router and it has a different internal range to the old one.

If you have an IP address automatically after booting then something is bringing up the network automatically. Assuming
your Arch install is newer than 2013 then I would expect you've configured netctl to manage the interface.

Look in /etc/netctl

and

$ systemctl list-unit-files --state=enabled

---
mrrob
---
mick howe via arch-general
2017-07-13 02:58:03 UTC
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Post by Mrrob
Post by mick howe via arch-general
I've just changed ISP and I can't get the changed configuration to stick.
I'm using 'static IP address - manual assignment' from Network
configuration wiki page.
I need to change my address from 192.168.1.0/24 to 192.168.20.1/24.
using iproute2 tools as per wiki I can get everything working UNTIL I
reboot, at which time some of the settings show the old values and others
the new.
I've been manually configuring these settings without problems since I
started using linux in 1994.
I assume that (as well as changing ISPs) you have changed your router and
it has a different internal range to the old one.
​Correct​
Post by Mrrob
If you have an IP address automatically after booting then something is
bringing up the network automatically. Assuming your Arch install is newer
than 2013 then I would expect you've configured netctl to manage the
interface.
​About april 2013​
​, can't remember details of what I did then but I would have used what was
most like the ​the original method.
Post by Mrrob
Look in /etc/netctl
[***@cave ~]$ ls -aR /etc/netctl
/etc/netctl:
. .. examples hooks interfaces

/etc/netctl/examples:
. ethernet-static tunnel wireless-wpa
.. macvlan-dhcp tuntap wireless-wpa-config
​​
bonding macvlan-static vlan-dhcp wireless-wpa-configsection
bridge mobile_ppp vlan-static wireless-wpa-static
ethernet-custom openvswitch wireless-open
ethernet-dhcp pppoe wireless-wep

/etc/netctl/hooks:
. ..

/etc/netctl/interfaces:
. ..
Post by Mrrob
and
$ systemctl list-unit-files --state=enabled
---
mrrob
---
Rich
2017-07-13 03:14:07 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by mick howe via arch-general
Post by Mrrob
Post by mick howe via arch-general
I've just changed ISP and I can't get the changed configuration to stick.
I'm using 'static IP address - manual assignment' from Network
configuration wiki page.
I need to change my address from 192.168.1.0/24 to 192.168.20.1/24.
using iproute2 tools as per wiki I can get everything working UNTIL I
reboot, at which time some of the settings show the old values and others
the new.
I've been manually configuring these settings without problems since I
started using linux in 1994.
I assume that (as well as changing ISPs) you have changed your router and
it has a different internal range to the old one.
​Correct​
Post by Mrrob
If you have an IP address automatically after booting then something is
bringing up the network automatically. Assuming your Arch install is newer
than 2013 then I would expect you've configured netctl to manage the
interface.
​About april 2013​
​, can't remember details of what I did then but I would have used what was
most like the ​the original method.
Post by Mrrob
Look in /etc/netctl
. .. examples hooks interfaces
. ethernet-static tunnel wireless-wpa
.. macvlan-dhcp tuntap wireless-wpa-config
​​
bonding macvlan-static vlan-dhcp wireless-wpa-configsection
bridge mobile_ppp vlan-static wireless-wpa-static
ethernet-custom openvswitch wireless-open
ethernet-dhcp pppoe wireless-wep
. ..
. ..
Post by Mrrob
and
$ systemctl list-unit-files --state=enabled
---
mrrob
---
You are probably using dhcpcd. This is what is installed when initially
setting up the OS. Depending on exactly what settings are being reverted
to default it may be normal behavior. What you need to do is find out
exactly which network manager you are using and exactly what settings
are not sticking across a reboot. The fix is probably not difficult but
need more info to be able to make intelligent suggestions. I had a
problem with dhcpcd reverting my DNS servers to the ISP defaults on
every restart.

--Rich
mick howe via arch-general
2017-07-13 03:30:15 UTC
Permalink
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Post by mick howe via arch-general
Post by mick howe via arch-general
I've just changed ISP and I can't get the changed configuration to stick.
Post by mick howe via arch-general
I'm using 'static IP address - manual assignment' from Network
configuration wiki page.
I need to change my address from 192.168.1.0/24 to 192.168.20.1/24.
using iproute2 tools as per wiki I can get everything working UNTIL I
reboot, at which time some of the settings show the old values and others
the new.
I've been manually configuring these settings without problems since I
started using linux in 1994.
I assume that (as well as changing ISPs) you have changed your router
and
it has a different internal range to the old one.
​Correct​
Post by mick howe via arch-general
If you have an IP address automatically after booting then something is
bringing up the network automatically. Assuming your Arch install is newer
than 2013 then I would expect you've configured netctl to manage the
interface.
​About april 2013​
​, can't remember details of what I did then but I would have used what was
most like the ​the original method.
Post by mick howe via arch-general
Look in /etc/netctl
. .. examples hooks interfaces
. ethernet-static tunnel wireless-wpa
.. macvlan-dhcp tuntap wireless-wpa-config
​​
bonding macvlan-static vlan-dhcp
wireless-wpa-configsection
bridge mobile_ppp vlan-static wireless-wpa-static
ethernet-custom openvswitch wireless-open
ethernet-dhcp pppoe wireless-wep
. ..
. ..
Post by mick howe via arch-general
and
$ systemctl list-unit-files --state=enabled
---
mrrob
---
You are probably using dhcpcd. This is what is installed when initially
setting up the OS. Depending on exactly what settings are being reverted to
default it may be normal behavior. What you need to do is find out exactly
which network manager you are using and exactly what settings are not
sticking across a reboot. The fix is probably not difficult but need more
info to be able to make intelligent suggestions. I had a problem with
dhcpcd reverting my DNS servers to the ISP defaults on every restart.
--Rich
mick howe via arch-general
2017-07-13 03:37:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Rich
You are probably using dhcpcd. This is what is installed when initially
setting up the OS. Depending on exactly what settings are being reverted to
default it may be normal behavior. What you need to do is find out exactly
which network manager you are using and exactly what settings are not
sticking across a reboot. The fix is probably not difficult but need more
info to be able to make intelligent suggestions. I had a problem with
dhcpcd reverting my DNS servers to the ISP defaults on every restart.
--Rich
​I tried it when I first started with linux in 1994​ and now avoid it like
the plague, I'd rather do it manually. It was simple until somebody decided
I need a string of cascading daemons to do everything.

mick stressed out and frustrated in frozen glen innes
David C. Rankin
2017-07-16 07:40:42 UTC
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Post by mick howe via arch-general
Post by Rich
You are probably using dhcpcd. This is what is installed when initially
setting up the OS. Depending on exactly what settings are being reverted to
default it may be normal behavior. What you need to do is find out exactly
which network manager you are using and exactly what settings are not
sticking across a reboot. The fix is probably not difficult but need more
info to be able to make intelligent suggestions. I had a problem with
dhcpcd reverting my DNS servers to the ISP defaults on every restart.
--Rich
​I tried it when I first started with linux in 1994​ and now avoid it like
the plague, I'd rather do it manually. It was simple until somebody decided
I need a string of cascading daemons to do everything.
mick stressed out and frustrated in frozen glen innes
There was a simple elegance in rc.conf, e.g.:

interface=eth0
address=192.168.1.17
netmask=255.255.255.0
broadcast=192.168.1.255
gateway=192.168.1.11

But with netctl, (https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Netctl) it's not that
much different. Instead of rc.conf, find your network interface with `ip addr`
(enp0s10 below), create a profile in /etc/netctl (say /etc/netctl/mystaticip).
You can pull an example of a static setup from /etc/netctl/examples. A minimal
example (for ipv4) a static IP is something like:

Description='A basic static ethernet connection'
Interface=enp0s10
Connection=ethernet
IP=static
Address=('192.168.1.16/24')
#Routes=('192.168.0.0/24 via 192.168.1.2') ## I don't use
Gateway='192.168.1.13'
DNS=('192.168.1.16')

Then (after testing with e.g. 'netctl start mystaticip'), all you need to do
to have it set each time you boot is issue the command

# netctl enable mystaticip

which will essentially create the hook required to activate your connection in
/etc/systemd/system.

Hopefully that will relieve some stress and frustration.
--
David C. Rankin, J.D.,P.E.
mick howe via arch-general
2017-07-13 03:29:38 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Mrrob
Post by mick howe via arch-general
I've just changed ISP and I can't get the changed configuration to stick.
I'm using 'static IP address - manual assignment' from Network
configuration wiki page.
I need to change my address from 192.168.1.0/24 to 192.168.20.1/24.
using iproute2 tools as per wiki I can get everything working UNTIL I
reboot, at which time some of the settings show the old values and others
the new.
I've been manually configuring these settings without problems since I
started using linux in 1994.
I assume that (as well as changing ISPs) you have changed your router and
it has a different internal range to the old one.
​Correct, and the ISP failed to include modem password in the box.
Post by Mrrob
If you have an IP address automatically after booting then something is
bringing up the network automatically. Assuming your Arch install is newer
than 2013 then I would expect you've configured netctl to manage the
interface.
​I had to reinstal when I moved in April 2013, would have used the simplest
manual method

Post by Mrrob
Look in /etc/netctl
[***@cave ~]$ ls -aR /etc/netctl/etc/netctl:
. .. examples hooks interfaces
Post by Mrrob
. ethernet-static tunnel wireless-wpa
.. macvlan-dhcp tuntap wireless-wpa-config
bonding macvlan-static vlan-dhcp wireless-wpa-configsection
bridge mobile_ppp vlan-static wireless-wpa-static
ethernet-custom openvswitch wireless-open
ethernet-dhcp
​ ​
pppoe
​ ​
wireless-wep
. ..
. ..
and
$ systemctl list-unit-files --state=enabled
UNIT FILE STATE
org.cups.cupsd.path enabled
***@.service enabled
dbus-org.freedesktop.network1.service enabled
dbus-org.freedesktop.resolve1.service enabled
display-manager.service enabled
***@.service enabled
httpd.service enabled
lxdm.service enabled
nmbd.service enabled
openntpd.service enabled
org.cups.cupsd.service enabled
postgresql.service enabled
smbd.service enabled
systemd-networkd.service enabled
systemd-resolved.service enabled
org.cups.cupsd.socket enabled
systemd-networkd.socket enabled
remote-fs.target enabled

18 unit files listed.
lines 1-21
​is blahbluhblah​network1.service the guilty party or is it
systemd-networkd.service?

what am I looking for in these?
Rich
2017-07-13 03:43:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by mick howe via arch-general
Post by Mrrob
Post by mick howe via arch-general
I've just changed ISP and I can't get the changed configuration to stick.
I'm using 'static IP address - manual assignment' from Network
configuration wiki page.
I need to change my address from 192.168.1.0/24 to 192.168.20.1/24.
using iproute2 tools as per wiki I can get everything working UNTIL I
reboot, at which time some of the settings show the old values and others
the new.
I've been manually configuring these settings without problems since I
started using linux in 1994.
I assume that (as well as changing ISPs) you have changed your router and
it has a different internal range to the old one.
​Correct, and the ISP failed to include modem password in the box.
Post by Mrrob
If you have an IP address automatically after booting then something is
bringing up the network automatically. Assuming your Arch install is newer
than 2013 then I would expect you've configured netctl to manage the
interface.
​I had to reinstal when I moved in April 2013, would have used the simplest
manual method

Post by Mrrob
Look in /etc/netctl
. .. examples hooks interfaces
Post by Mrrob
. ethernet-static tunnel wireless-wpa
.. macvlan-dhcp tuntap wireless-wpa-config
bonding macvlan-static vlan-dhcp wireless-wpa-configsection
bridge mobile_ppp vlan-static wireless-wpa-static
ethernet-custom openvswitch wireless-open
ethernet-dhcp
​ ​
pppoe
​ ​
wireless-wep
. ..
. ..
and
$ systemctl list-unit-files --state=enabled
UNIT FILE STATE
org.cups.cupsd.path enabled
dbus-org.freedesktop.network1.service enabled
dbus-org.freedesktop.resolve1.service enabled
display-manager.service enabled
httpd.service enabled
lxdm.service enabled
nmbd.service enabled
openntpd.service enabled
org.cups.cupsd.service enabled
postgresql.service enabled
smbd.service enabled
systemd-networkd.service enabled
systemd-resolved.service enabled
org.cups.cupsd.socket enabled
systemd-networkd.socket enabled
remote-fs.target enabled
18 unit files listed.
lines 1-21
​is blahbluhblah​network1.service the guilty party or is it
systemd-networkd.service?
what am I looking for in these?
This is the wiki page for the network manager you are using:
systemd-networkd https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Systemd-networkd

--Rich
mick howe via arch-general
2017-07-13 22:41:15 UTC
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Raw Message
thank you, I now can make sense of most of what to do. DNS isn't working if
I try to go through the new modem but that is an issue with the ISP and
configuring the modem once I get the password for the account.
Post by Rich
Post by mick howe via arch-general
Post by mick howe via arch-general
I've just changed ISP and I can't get the changed configuration to stick.
Post by mick howe via arch-general
I'm using 'static IP address - manual assignment' from Network
configuration wiki page.
I need to change my address from 192.168.1.0/24 to 192.168.20.1/24.
using iproute2 tools as per wiki I can get everything working UNTIL I
reboot, at which time some of the settings show the old values and others
the new.
I've been manually configuring these settings without problems since I
started using linux in 1994.
I assume that (as well as changing ISPs) you have changed your router
and
it has a different internal range to the old one.
​Correct, and the ISP failed to include modem password in the box.
If you have an IP address automatically after booting then something is
bringing up the network automatically. Assuming your Arch install is newer
than 2013 then I would expect you've configured netctl to manage the
interface.
​I had to reinstal when I moved in April 2013, would have used the
simplest
manual method

Look in /etc/netctl
. .. examples hooks interfaces
Post by mick howe via arch-general
. ethernet-static tunnel wireless-wpa
.. macvlan-dhcp tuntap wireless-wpa-config
bonding macvlan-static vlan-dhcp wireless-wpa-configsection
bridge mobile_ppp vlan-static wireless-wpa-static
ethernet-custom openvswitch wireless-open
ethernet-dhcp
​ ​
pppoe
​ ​
wireless-wep
. ..
. ..
and
Post by mick howe via arch-general
$ systemctl list-unit-files --state=enabled
UNIT FILE STATE
org.cups.cupsd.path enabled
dbus-org.freedesktop.network1.service enabled
dbus-org.freedesktop.resolve1.service enabled
display-manager.service enabled
httpd.service enabled
lxdm.service enabled
nmbd.service enabled
openntpd.service enabled
org.cups.cupsd.service enabled
postgresql.service enabled
smbd.service enabled
systemd-networkd.service enabled
systemd-resolved.service enabled
org.cups.cupsd.socket enabled
systemd-networkd.socket enabled
remote-fs.target enabled
18 unit files listed.
lines 1-21
​is blahbluhblah​network1.service the guilty party or is it
systemd-networkd.service?
what am I looking for in these?
systemd-networkd https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Systemd-networkd
--Rich
Mrrob
2017-07-13 03:47:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by mick howe via arch-general
Post by Mrrob
Post by mick howe via arch-general
I've just changed ISP and I can't get the changed configuration to stick.
I'm using 'static IP address - manual assignment' from Network
configuration wiki page.
I need to change my address from 192.168.1.0/24 to 192.168.20.1/24.
using iproute2 tools as per wiki I can get everything working UNTIL I
reboot, at which time some of the settings show the old values and others
the new.
I've been manually configuring these settings without problems since I
started using linux in 1994.
I assume that (as well as changing ISPs) you have changed your router and
it has a different internal range to the old one.
​Correct, and the ISP failed to include modem password in the box.
Post by Mrrob
If you have an IP address automatically after booting then something is
bringing up the network automatically. Assuming your Arch install is newer
than 2013 then I would expect you've configured netctl to manage the
interface.
​I had to reinstal when I moved in April 2013, would have used the simplest
manual method

Post by Mrrob
Look in /etc/netctl
. .. examples hooks interfaces
Post by Mrrob
. ethernet-static tunnel wireless-wpa
.. macvlan-dhcp tuntap wireless-wpa-config
bonding macvlan-static vlan-dhcp wireless-wpa-configsection
bridge mobile_ppp vlan-static wireless-wpa-static
ethernet-custom openvswitch wireless-open
ethernet-dhcp
​ ​
pppoe
​ ​
wireless-wep
. ..
. ..
and
$ systemctl list-unit-files --state=enabled
UNIT FILE STATE
org.cups.cupsd.path enabled
dbus-org.freedesktop.network1.service enabled
dbus-org.freedesktop.resolve1.service enabled
display-manager.service enabled
httpd.service enabled
lxdm.service enabled
nmbd.service enabled
openntpd.service enabled
org.cups.cupsd.service enabled
postgresql.service enabled
smbd.service enabled
systemd-networkd.service enabled
systemd-resolved.service enabled
org.cups.cupsd.socket enabled
systemd-networkd.socket enabled
remote-fs.target enabled
18 unit files listed.
lines 1-21
​is blahbluhblah​network1.service the guilty party or is it
systemd-networkd.service?
what am I looking for in these?
_They_ announced the change from netcfg to netctl on the 10th of April 2013. This isn't entirely relevant to the problem
but may give insight into how you originally set it up. [0] If you want you can look at the old versions of the wiki
page for netcfg.

It looks like systemd-networkd.service is responsible [1]. I suggest you look to reconfigure that perhaps by looking for
foo.network configs in /etc/systemd/network/ or using networkctl.

[0] https://www.archlinux.org/news/netctl-is-now-in-core/
[1] https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/systemd-networkd

---
mrrob
---
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